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The Patterdale Terrier is a small working dog. In the UK it is not a dog type that was initially recognised by the UK Kennel Cub as a pedigree. As such the Patterdale has been bred as a working dog, so the appearance can differ widely. This phenomenon is common in several types of working dog, including as the Border Collie. According to breed standards, this working terrier stands between 25.5 cm (10 in) and 12 inches at the withers and weighs between 10 and 13 pounds. The preferred size depends on the quarry. In the UK, all sizes are in use, depending on the terrain and quarry: in the UK, the most common quarry was the fox. In the eastern United States, smaller dogs are preferred and 30 cm (12 in) tall and 5.5 kg (12 lb) is the preferred size for groundhogs. However, somewhat larger dogs can be used in the American West when ground barn hunting larger raccoons and badgers. Patterdale puppies tend to be bold and confident beyond their capabilities, and responsible owners of working dogs will not overmatch their dogs or introduce them to formidable quarry before they are around a year and a half of age. Even as a yearling, the dog will not be fully capable. The Patterdale is a working terrier, and terrier work requires a high-energy dog with a strong prey drive and a loud voice. As a result, Patterdales are very energetic dogs, and can be quite vocal. It is not uncommon for a Patterdale to be cat-aggressive, and homes which have other small fur-bearing pets (such as hamsters, rabbits, guinea pigs) would do well to think through the ramifications of bringing a working terrier into the house. However, as with all breeds there is variation. Some Patterdales are more animal-friendly, befriending and cleaning cats and other dogs alike. Patterdales are prone to the sulks if their owners pay attention to others. Patterdales display an intriguing crawl, similar to an act of prostration, used to gain attention and stalk quarry through long grass. This originates from their inbred ability to compress their lungs to fit into small spaces, in search of their prey. The Patterdale was developed in the harsh environment in the north of England, an area unsuitable for arable farming and too hilly for cattle. Sheep farming is the predominant farming activity on these hills. Since the fox is perceived by farmers as being predatory on sheep and small farm animals, terriers are used for predator control. Unlike the dirt dens found in the hunt country of the south, the rocky dens found in the north do not allow much digging. As a consequence, the terrier needs to be able to bolt the fox from the rock crevice or dispatch it where it is found. The use of "hard" dogs to hunt foxes in this way was made illegal in England and Wales by the Hunting Act 2004, as it runs counter to the code of practice under the Act. In the United States, The Patterdale Terrier was recognised by the United Kennel Club on January 1, 1995; yet it remains unrecognized by the American Kennel Club. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]



The Crazy Horse Memorial is a mountain monument under construction in the Black Hills of South Dakota, in the form of Crazy Horse, an Oglala Lakota warrior, riding a horse and pointing into the distance. The memorial consists of the mountain carving, the Indian Museum of North America, and the Native American Cultural Center. The monument is being carved out of Thunderhead Mountain on land considered sacred by some Native Americans, between Custer and Hill City, roughly 8 miles (13 km) away from Mount Rushmore. The sculpture's final dimensions are planned to be 641 feet wide and 563 feet high. The head of Crazy Horse will be 87 feet high; by comparison, the heads of the four U.S. Presidents at Mount Rushmore are each 60 feet high. The monument has been in progress since 1948 and is still far from completion. Crazy Horse resisted being photographed, and was deliberately buried where his grave would not be found. Ziolkowski, however, envisioned the monument as a metaphoric tribute to the spirit of Crazy Horse and Native Americans. "My lands are where my dead lie buried," supposedly said by Crazy Horse, is the intended interpretation of the monument's expansive gesture. While Lakota Chief Henry Standing Bear believes the motives may have been sincere, many traditional Lakota and Native Americans oppose this memorial. In a 2001 interview, the activist and actor Russell Means stated his objections to the memorial: "Imagine going to the holy land in Israel, whether you're a Christian or a Jew or a Muslim, and start carving up the mountain of Zion. It's an insult to our entire being." In a 1972 autobiography, Lame Deer, a Lakota medicine man, said: "The whole idea of making a beautiful wild mountain into a statue of him is a pollution of the landscape. It is against the spirit of Crazy Horse." To this day, the memorial remains controversial within the Native American community. The statue has been hit by lightning many times, many Natives believe this is because Crazy Horse never wanted his picture taken so the great spirits will ensure this statue will never be finished. If finished, it will be the world's largest statue. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]



The 2009 Iranian Air Force mid-air collision on September 22, 2009 involved an Ilyushin IL-76MD and a Northrop F-5E Tiger II aircraft. The accident resulted in the destruction of Iran's only functional aircraft equipped with an Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS). A military parade was held in Tehran on September 22, 2009 to mark the anniversary of the start of the 1980–1988 Iran–Iraq War, and was a send-off for President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad who was to give a speech at the United Nations General Assembly in New York on September 23. A fly-past by the Iranian Air Force was part of the parade. An AWACS-equipped Ilyushin-76MD was to be escorted by several Northrop F-5E Tiger II aircraft. The Il-76MD and one of the escorts collided in mid-air over the site of the tomb of former Iranian leader Ayatollah Khomeni. The Ilyushin subsequently crashed in flames at Varamin killing all seven crew members on board. According to Western observers, no mayday call was made by either aircraft indicating a sudden event. The accident was initially reported on the Islamic Republic News Agency website, but was withdrawn 5 hours later. A video of burning wreckage from the military aircraft surrounded by fire trucks was also shown on state TV. However, president Ahmadinejad made no mention of it during his speech at the parade. The escort aircraft was a US-made Northrop F-5E Tiger II. The other aircraft involved was an Ilyushin Il-76MD, a Soviet-built transport aircraft, fitted with AWACS system for the Iraqi Air Force. It was evacuated to Iran in 1991 during the First Gulf War, given serial number 5-8209 and renamed from "Baghdad" to "Simorgh" (a flying creature of Iranian fable which performs wonders in mid-flight). Russian technicians reportedly upgraded the aircraft and installed a newer Iranian-made radar, which could trace flying objects within 1,000 km from Iranian borders. The aircraft came into service in April 2008 and was the only AWACS-equipped Iranian aircraft. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]



Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III was an American stand-up comedian, actor, and writer. Pryor was known for uncompromising examinations of racism and topical contemporary issues, which employed colorful, vulgar, and profane language and racial epithets. He reached a broad audience with his trenchant observations and storytelling style. He is widely regarded as one of the most important stand-up comedians: Jerry Seinfeld called Pryor "The Picasso of our profession"; Bob Newhart has called Pryor "the seminal comedian of the last 50 years." His body of work includes the concert movies and recordings Richard Pryor: Live and Smokin' (1971), That Nigger's Crazy (1974), ...Is It Something I Said? (1975), Bicentennial Nigger (1976), Richard Pryor: Live in Concert (1979), Richard Pryor: Live on the Sunset Strip (1982), and Richard Pryor: Here and Now (1983). He also starred in numerous films as an actor such as Superman III (1983) but was usually in comedies such as Silver Streak (1976), but occasionally in dramatic roles, such as Paul Schrader's film Blue Collar (1978). He collaborated on many projects with actor Gene Wilder. Pryor developed a reputation for being difficult and unprofessional on film sets, and for making unreasonable demands. In his autobiography Kiss Me Like a Stranger, co-star Gene Wilder says that Pryor was frequently late to the set during filming of Stir Crazy, and that he demanded, among other things, a helicopter to fly him to and from set. On June 9, 1980, during the making of the film Bustin' Loose, Pryor set himself on fire after freebasing cocaine while drinking 151-proof rum. He ran down Parthenia St. from his Northridge, California, home until subdued by police. He was taken to the hospital, where he was treated for burns covering more than half of his body. Pryor spent six weeks in recovery at the Grossman Burn Center at Sherman Oaks Hospital. His daughter, Rain Pryor, has stated that Pryor poured high-proof rum over his body and set himself on fire in a bout of drug-induced psychosis. Pryor was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1986. On December 10, 2005, Pryor went into cardiac arrest in Encino, California. He was taken to a local hospital after his wife's attempts to resuscitate him failed. He was pronounced dead at 7:58 am PST. His widow Jennifer was quoted as saying, "At the end, there was a smile on his face." He was cremated and his ashes were given to friends and family. WARNING: VIDEO CLIP CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE. [READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE]



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